Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Political Philosophy and Paine Essay example - 1568 Words

Jesus Chaveste HIST 1301 Dr. Olivares September 7, 2013 Thomas Paine Questions 1. Why do you think Thomas Paine writes Common Sense anonymously? How does he think his work will be remembered? Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense anonymously because the ideas he used in writing the book were contradicting the government at that time. If the government knew that he wrote it then they will take action against him to punish him. He probably thought that his work would remain as something memorable such as it was only there to raise the spirit of the colonist to fight back and to stand up against the government. 2. According to Paine, what is the difference between society and government? Paine states that society and government are†¦show more content†¦6. What is the view of Gideon that Paine uses as an example? As the exalting one man so greatly above the rest cannot be justified on the equal rights of nature, so neither can it be defended on the authority of scripture; for the will of the Almighty (Gideon). From this quote of Gideon, we can assume Gideons point of views. He thinks that all men are equal and no one man can be above the rest. He also thinks that only God can rule over people. 7. What does Paine think that America will gain by separating from England? According to Paine, America will gain by separating from England is that it would not get contaminated by the monarchy he has been criticizing. Then, America will gain wealth and most importantly it will gain independence. 8.Describe Thomas Paines life and background, including where he is originally from and what his reputation was before, during, and after writing Common Sense. On January 29, 1737, Thomas Paine was born in Thetford, England. His father had grand visions for his son, but by the age of 12, Thomas had failed out of school. The young Paine began apprenticing for his father, but again, he failed. So, by 1768 he found himself as a tax officerShow MoreRelatedThomas Paine And His Father1718 Words   |  7 PagesPhilosopher Thomas Paine Thomas Paine was born in Norfolk, England on January 29, 1737 to a middle-income family. His father was a Quaker while his mother was an Anglican, therefore, constant family arguments about religion became part of Thomas life (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 2). He did not have much of formal education as he quit schooling at the age of thirteen years and began working for his father. He was baptized in the Anglican Church that his mother attended. His father had forbiddenRead MoreEssay about Paine and Burke1644 Words   |  7 PagesHOW FAR DO POLITICAL PHILOSOPHIES OF EITHER HOBBES AND LOCKE OR PAINE AND BURKE DIFFER. This essay will examine the philosophical difference between Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine relating to the French and American Revolutions at the late Eighteenth Century. We are going to present a summary of the debate between these two different philosophers in the first part of this essay. The pros and cons of each man will be looked at in the second and third part of the essay and the final part of thisRead MoreThomas Paine Common Sense Analysis772 Words   |  4 PagesPaine’s Common Sense â€Å"My country is the world, and my religion is to do good† (Thomas Paine common sense). Thomas Paine was an English-American political activist and philosopher who changed the world through his words and writing. In Common Sense, distributed in January 1776, the pamphlets sold in the thousands and was extremely persuasive. It transformed a neighborhood uprising into a War of Independence and Thomas Paine was given the title Father of the American Revolution. He challenged great mindsRead MorePaine s The Age Of Reason1192 Words   |  5 PagesPaine s American Pamphlet (to be independent from England - 1776) 48 pages in duration Thomas Paine (1737 - 1809) Anglo-American political activist / philosopher. Author of The Age of Reason. - - - Common Sense was an addressing for the America people, I doubt Thomas Paine intended the book to go beyond print and into the realm of digital media eight years ago. Now America again is about to elect another commander and chief on November 8th, I felt it was time to reinstate the words ofRead MoreThe Age of Reason and Revolution Essay810 Words   |  4 Pagesrevival to mankind, others rejected these new improvements and felt as if they were defying god. These years were full of discoveries, conflicts, and new visions of the world. The age of reason brought on many changes to religious, political, scientific, and literary aspects of the eighteenth century. The Age of Reason and Revolution was a time of change. This age, and the changes in it, was mainly brought upon by the Renaissance, along with some other technologicalRead MoreCommon Sense By Thomas Paine1438 Words   |  6 PagesKayla Boucher Doctor Hockin AMH 2010 22 January 2015 Common Sense The book Common Sense by Thomas Paine was an American pamphlet written during the American Revolution, which was around the time when America was trying to gain independence from Britain. Paine discusses government, religion, and colonial issues. In the first chapter Paine differentiates between the society and the government. He described the society as being positive and constructive and he described the government beingRead MoreCauses of The American Revolution Essay983 Words   |  4 Pages The period before the American Revolution was characterized by a series of social as well as political shifts that occurred in American society as new republican principles took hold in the gentry of the colonies. That time era distinguished the sharp political debates between radicals and moderates over the role that democracy should play in a government. This broad new American shift to republicanism and a newfound support of democracy was a catastrophe to the traditional social hierarch y, whichRead MoreThomas Paine and the Pamphlet Common Sense814 Words   |  3 PagesThomas Paine was responsible for some of the most influential works of the revolution. Paine’s pamphlet Common Sense was a very crucial part to America and its movement of independence from Britain. Paine was effective with his writings by being very plain. He wanted both farmers and officials to understand what he was talking about and be able to comprehend his ideas. Paine wanted to put his ideas out to the people of the American colonies so that they could understand it just by reading and notRead MoreThe American Crisis By Thomas Paine998 Words   |  4 Pagesseries by 18th century Enlightenment philosopher and author Thomas Paine, originally published from 1776 to 1783 during the American Revolution. Often known as The American Crisis or simply The Crisis, there are 16 pamphlets in total. Thirteen numbered pamphlets were published between 1776 and 1777, with three additional pamphlets r eleased between 1777 and 1783. The first of the pamphlets were published in Pennsylvania Journal. Paine signed the pamphlets with the pseudonym, Common Sense.The pamphletsRead More Age of reason Essay1294 Words   |  6 Pagesthoughtful philosophy (Hampshire 105). However, the public ignored this important piece of work making Hume feel like he was quot;dead-born.quot; After this horrible reaction to A Treatise of Human Nature Hume went back home where he started thinking more about ethics and political economy. Along with these thoughts Hume wrote books expressing how he felt about these subjects (Snyder34). Essay Moral and Political was one book that enclosed an essay written by Hume dealing with ethics and political economy

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Privacy Invasion of Consumers Through the Internet...

The Privacy Invasion of Consumers Through the Internet and Bluetooth Devices ABSTRACT Faster, easier, and cheaper access to a plethora of information, products and people is a primary stimulus for the growing number of online consumers who use the Internet to fulfill information foraging, communication and commerce needs. Oddly enough, these conveniences appear to override users concerns of privacy invasion. As the mechanisms behind information technologies become increasingly transparent, users must trust the companies producing the products to protect them from privacy invasion and refrain from deceitful consumer information practices. Should consumers continue to put faith in companies who may be more concerned about†¦show more content†¦In 1998, the Federal Trade Commission determined that very few companies were divulging their usage of consumers’ personal data (Labalme â€Å"Fair Information Practices†). In an effort to encourage fair information practices, the FTC created guidelines for company privacy policies (â€Å"Enforcing Privacy Promises†). The guidelines, known as the Fair Information Practice Principles urge companies to clearly define the following: the company’s information practices; the consumer’s option to accept, decline, or specify usage of personal information; the consumer’s right to access personal data collected; the company’s affirmation of data accuracy and security; and the company’s intent to enforce the privacy policy (Labalme â€Å"Fair Information Practices†). As a result of the industry’s failure to adhere to the FIPP guidelines, the FTC urged Congress to create laws protecting privacy rights of consumers. Siding with corporate capitalists in favor of industry self-regulation, Congress declined to help. The FTC was ultimately left responsible for monitoring and prosecuting unfair information practices under section five of the Federal Trade Commission Act, which covers deceitful practices (Turow 8). Without congressional s upport,Show MoreRelatedPreventive Measures For Smartphones.1512 Words   |  7 Pages With the number of devices on the market, who do we blame when people are not aware of risks involved? What tips or tools are established to educate the number of users and network providers of the potential dangers? Even though creators of smartphones do not need to provide these tips for consumers, smartphone manufacturers and distributors should be legally obligated to provide educational security tips and tools for consumers because it protects privacy, ensures consumers are fully secure, andRead MoreThe Information Age : How Safe Are We?1525 Words   |  7 Pagesin the age of technology and the Internet particularly regarding the privacy of protected information. Preview: While the Internet, cellphones and ATM machines provide us with a very convenient lifestyle there are inherent dangers-mostly and especially financial dangers, to those who share their personal information online or on their home computers. Introduction: I. Attention getter: I was checking my email and I ran across a message from PayPal, a popular internet site for processing online paymentsRead MoreThe Future Of Personal Transportation1052 Words   |  5 Pagesmake it seem. That being said, it is important for the public to be aware of the new threats involved in driving automated cars. A consumer interest in online vehicle security will push manufacturers to invest in better security systems to defend against hacker attacks. The vast majority of hackers are not looking to murder people. Most likely they seek to invade privacy, or exploit online services for financial gain. These people are looking to be a nuisance and possibly trying to harass particularRead MoreThanks to the Internet, Collection, Organization, and Retrieval of Information is Quick and Efficient2036 Words   |  9 Pagesorganization, and retrieval of information from consumers. Usually this data was organized manually, requiring services from different agencies to create a consumer profile. The process was complex, sluggish, and expensive for one to gather such material. However thanks to the Internet, and now powerful computers and targeting algorithms in association with large-scale databases, has simplified this process and enhanced its yield greatly in Ecommerce. The Internet offers numerous opportunities to collectRead MoreMobile Commerce and Pervasive Computing3919 Words   |  16 Pagesapplications in finance, advertising, and p roviding of content. 6. Describe the applications of m-commerce within organizations. 7. Understand B2B and supply chain applications of m-commerce. 8. Describe consumer and personal applications of m-commerce. 9. Describe some non-Internet m-commerce applications. 10. Describe location-based commerce. 11. Discuss the key characteristics and current uses of pervasive computing. 12. Describe the major inhibitors and barriers of m-commerceRead MoreApple Case1412 Words   |  6 Pagesafter the launch of the iPod, Apples iTunes Music Store opened for business. The companys goal was to sell 1 million songs in the first six months. It hit this goal in six days. CAPITALIZING ON THE IPOD With millions of iPods in the hands of consumers, other companies are noticing the trend and finding ways to capitalize on the product. John Lin created a prototype of a remote control for the iPod. Lin took his prototype to Macworld where he found success. A few months later, Lins company hadRead MoreFacebook Future Strategy7618 Words   |  31 Pagespeople. Facebook has been successful driving revenue by developing algorithms and application programming interfaces. These revenue drivers turned their social networking platform into an advertising tool, connecting third-party businesses to quality consumers. Although Facebook’s user base and revenue are growing at very rapid rate, there is concern with their future strategy. This paper addresses that concern and the doubt that the revenue streams the company has developed will be sustainable in theRead MoreThe Aging Population Of America9973 Words   |  40 Pagescare for one person under age 65, the Centers for Disease Co ntrol (CDC) reported, and sometimes the costs and the responsibilities fall on the next generation. By 2050, 227 million adults globally are expected to require a caregiver to help them through the aging process (Matthews, 2013). This suggests that older adults will soon overwhelm the number of caregivers available to assist them. To compensate for this, many are looking towards helping older adults stay in their home for asRead MoreeCommerce Developments and Themes10793 Words   |  44 PagesE-Business Chapter 1 E-commerce Developments and Themes- 2003 More: ï  ® Use of the Internet to conduct commerce ï  ® deepening of e-commerce channel ï  ® Broadband and wireless Internet access ï  ® refined e-commerce business models (→ higher levels of profitability) But at societal level: continued conflict over copyrights, content regulation, taxation, privacy, and Internet fraud and abuse. E-commerce E-business E-commerce involves digitally enabled commercial transactions between and amongRead MoreManaging Information Technology (7th Edition)239873 Words   |  960 PagesCASE STUDY II-5 The Cliptomaniaâ„ ¢ Web Store: An E-Tailing Start-up Survival Story CASE STUDY II-6 Rock Island Chocolate Company, Inc.: Building a Social Networking Strategy CASE STUDY III-1 Managing a Systems Development Project at Consumer and Industrial Products, Inc. CASE STUDY III-2 A Make-or-Buy Decision at Baxter Manufacturing Company CASE STUDY III-3 ERP Purchase Decision at Benton Manufacturing Company, Inc. CASE STUDY III-4 The Kuali Financial System: An

Analysis of Barclays Bank in Business Environment

Question: Discuss about the Analysis of Barclays Bank in Business Environment. Answer: With major mergers and acquisitions of a number of Quaker banks, Barclays entered into the investment banking forum. In the view point of Pearl and Rosenbaum (2013), entrant of new companies in the market is good for competition but with the increasing entry of investment banks in US, Barclays failed to match the pace and intense competition of the market and had to face critical issues. Barclay had to face great difficulty in combining the conventional and investment banking coherent model. The Bank was also pointed out towards mis-selling of payment protection insurance by major retail banks and misleading of inter-banking lending rate generated claims of practicing unfair means of profit (Johnson et al. 2013). This action drew great attention and criticism of public that ultimately caused trouble to the Bank. Failed to meet organizational culture: There was a change in the management of the Bank as well. The new CEO was not capable enough to comply with the organizational culture. The newly made CEO was an investment banker and a major deal maker who possessed unimaginable talent but could not meet the expectations of the employees working in the organization. In other words, the managerial quality of the new CEO could not match the psychological perspectives of the employees (Johnson et al. 2013). No investment or positive efforts were made towards improving the culture of the organization that ultimately resulted in slow degradation of the Bank. Paying bonuses after financial crisis in 2010-2011: The most crucial issue and crisis faced by the Bank were related to the problems that attributed to the bonus culture of the Bank. As commented by Cetorelli and Goldberg (2012), Barclays continued to pay high amount of money as bonus in spite of the continuous financial crisis in 2008-09. The problem related to the issue was that the Stakeholders of the organization had to compensate or subsidize this payment. This created a great havoc in the regular business operation of the Bank. It was claimed that major employees of the Bank cannot be driven by money and that paying the bonus to the employees was something unusual that the stakeholders have to ultimately subsidize from their profit margin (Claessens and Van Horen 2015). Therefore, this issue created a crucial issue for the organization. In the recent state of globalization, coming up with a business model and following the same as the business strategy to operate in the highly competitive market is indeed important as well as necessary. In case, if an organization fails to undertake proper precautionary actions against the issues and major challenges then there remained critical chances of the survival of the organization in the market. Reference list: Cetorelli, N. and Goldberg, L.S., 2012. Banking globalization and monetary transmission.The Journal of Finance,67(5), pp.1811-1843. Claessens, S. and Van Horen, N., 2015. The impact of the global financial crisis on banking globalization.IMF Economic Review,63(4), pp.868-918. Johnson, G., Whittington, R., Scholes, K., Angwin, D. and RegnÃ… ½r, P., 2013.Exploring Strategy Text Cases. Pearson Higher Ed. Pearl, J. and Rosenbaum, J., 2013.Investment banking: valuation, leveraged buyouts, and mergers and acquisitions. John Wiley Sons.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Taming Of The Shrew By William Shakespeare Essays -

Taming Of The Shrew By William Shakespeare The Taming Of The Shrew by William Shakespeare isprobably one of Shakespeare's earliest comedies. Its plot is derived from the popular 'war of the sexes' theme in which males and females are pitted against one another for dominance in marriage. The play begins with an induction inwhich a drunkard, Christopher Sly, is fooled into believing he is a king and has a play performed for him. The play hewatches is what constitutes the main body of The Taming OfThe Shrew. In it, a wealthy land owner, Baptista Minola, attempts to have his two daughters married. One is veryshrewish, Katherine, while the other is the beautiful and gentle Bianca. In order to ensure Katherine is married, Baptista disallows Bianca to be espoused until Katherine is wed, forcing the many suitors to Bianca to find a mate for Katherine in order for them to vie for Bianca's love. Many critics of the play condemn it for the blatant sexist attitude it has toward women but closer examination of the play and the intricacies of its structure reveal that it is not merely a story of how men should 'put women in their place'. The play is, in fact, a comedy about an assertive woman coping with how she is expected to act in the society of the late sixteenth century and of how one must obey the unwritten rules of a society to be accepted in it. Although the play ends with her outwardly conforming to the norms of society, this is in action only, not in mind. Although she assumes the role of the obedient wife, inwardly she still retains her assertiveness. Most of the play's humour comes from the way in which characters create false realities by disguising themselves as other people, a device first introduced in the induction. Initially this is accomplished by having Christopher Sly believe he is someone he is not and then by having the main play performed for him. By putting The Taming Of The Shrew in a 'play within a play' structure, Shakespeare immediately lets the audience know that the play is not real thus making all events in the play false realities. Almost all characters in the play take on dentities other than their own at some point of time during the play. Sly as a king, Tranio as Lucentio, Lucentio as Cambio, Hortensio as Litio and the pedant as Vicentio are all examples of this. Another example of this is Katherine as an obedient wife. In The Taming Of The Shrew, courtship and marriage are not so much the result of love but rather an institution of society that people are expected to take part in. As a result of the removal of romance from marriage, suitors are judged, not by their love for a woman, but by how well they can provide for her. All suitors compare the dowry each can bring to the marriage and the one with the most to offer 'wins' the woman's hand in marriage. This competition for marriage is like a game to the characters of the play. While discussing the courtship of Bianca with Gremio, Hortensio says He that runs fastest gets\ The ring (Act I, scene i, l. 140-141) likening receiving permission to wed Bianca to winning a race. In the game, however, women are treated like objects that can be bought and sold rather than as human beings. This is expected since the society is a patriarchal one. For example, Lucentio, Tranio and Petruchio are all defined with reference to their fathers and all the elderly authority figures, like Baptista and Vicentio, are men. The taming of Katherine is not a women's shrewishness being cured as much as it is a woman being taught the rules of the 'patriarchal game'. Katherine has learned how to be assertive and with this knowledge is able to control men, and a woman controlling a man is considered 'against the rules' of the game. The play ends with Katherine proving that she is truly cured of her 'shrewishness' and is the most obedient of the three newlywed wives at the end of the play. This is demonstrated in her soliloquy when she lectures the other wives on the proper way in which a woman should behave:I am ashamed

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Free Essays on The Phoenicians

The Phoenicians were a very intelligent culture they developed the alphabet, they were excellent ship builders, they also traded with many other cultures such as the Greek (which is where cultural diffusion took place and the Greeks adopted the alphabet but added the important vowels the Phoenicians left out. The Phoenicians also spoke a dialect and used coin money. The Phoenicians were very good wood and metal workers. They made and used furniture, metal work, and especially glassware. The Phoenicians were also well known for their purple dye known as â€Å"Tyrian Purple.† They had an excellent navy and used the stars to navigate. They controlled many city-states and eventually sailed North to Spain, Ireland, and England. There was a huge demand for metals such as gold, silver, copper, tin, and nickel. They would also make things like bronze and iron. The Phoenicians also possessed the skill of dentistry, which is evident by the fine braces on a lower jaw of a skull. In Massachusetts and Iowa there are Punic inscriptions that prove the Phoenicians had reached North America in BC. The Phoenician language is actually still spoken today in Malta. The Phoenicians also had a government. The first parliament ever in the Middle East met in the Phoenician confederate city of Tripoli. The Phoenicians were very peaceful though they enjoyed things such as art and explored North, South, East and west of because they loved adventure. They were one of strongest civilizations though because of their excellent navy. They united various races and many through friendly links, through this method they softened them and humanized them.... Free Essays on The Phoenicians Free Essays on The Phoenicians The Phoenicians were a very intelligent culture they developed the alphabet, they were excellent ship builders, they also traded with many other cultures such as the Greek (which is where cultural diffusion took place and the Greeks adopted the alphabet but added the important vowels the Phoenicians left out. The Phoenicians also spoke a dialect and used coin money. The Phoenicians were very good wood and metal workers. They made and used furniture, metal work, and especially glassware. The Phoenicians were also well known for their purple dye known as â€Å"Tyrian Purple.† They had an excellent navy and used the stars to navigate. They controlled many city-states and eventually sailed North to Spain, Ireland, and England. There was a huge demand for metals such as gold, silver, copper, tin, and nickel. They would also make things like bronze and iron. The Phoenicians also possessed the skill of dentistry, which is evident by the fine braces on a lower jaw of a skull. In Massachusetts and Iowa there are Punic inscriptions that prove the Phoenicians had reached North America in BC. The Phoenician language is actually still spoken today in Malta. The Phoenicians also had a government. The first parliament ever in the Middle East met in the Phoenician confederate city of Tripoli. The Phoenicians were very peaceful though they enjoyed things such as art and explored North, South, East and west of because they loved adventure. They were one of strongest civilizations though because of their excellent navy. They united various races and many through friendly links, through this method they softened them and humanized them....

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Boeing’s e-enabled advantage Essay Example for Free

Boeing’s e-enabled advantage Essay The Boeing Company is a major aerospace and defense corporation, originally founded by William E. Boeing in 1916 in Seattle, Washington. In 2004, it became one of the United State’s largest manufacturers with nearly 160, 000 employees and a net income of $1. 87 billion. It was the world’s largest aerospace company and for decades, had dominated the world’s commercial aviation market. THEIR STRATEGY Their main strategy was to streamline their core processes and to diversify. In streamlining their core processes, Boeing adopted simpler procedures for configuring aircraft to specifications, scheduling, ordering parts and managing inventory. They also diversified and entered into other markets, becoming more agile geographically and becoming less dependent on the highly cycled commercial jetliner market. They also integrated defense systems, Capital Corporation and the commercial airlines. HOW I. T. FACTORED INTO THAT In launching the aforementioned integration and innovative technologies, Boeing needed high end Information Technology expertise. That helped them launch a couple of websites including MyBoeingFleet. com. They also launched the Boeing Connexion and the Airplane Health Management (AHM). They went further and took great strides to understand both the airlines and the airline customers and integrate their business processes with Information Technology. This helped them provide broader services and is the main source of the e-enabled technology mentioned in the case study. This helped them plan and prioritize current and future processes effectively. THE MARKET Their market initially was the United States military which drove their technology but later grew to include commercial airliners. Their commercial airline market rapidly grew to 60% of the market world over and they appeared to have reached the pinnacle of the corporate might. As this happened, the only direction Boeing seemed to be headed was downward due to the emergence of big competitors. THEIR COMPETITION In the commercial airliner, Airbus seemed to be their biggest competition but because of all the technologies they integrated into their business, it was competing in segmented markets against industry giants like Oracle, IBM and Accenture as well as Garmin International and Aero Exchange International but their visionary leadership and their willingness to invest in technology sees them come out on top. THEIR WEAKNESS One of the main weaknesses of Boeing was their inablitiy to meet delivery schedules for airlines. Some airplanes they manufactured were also said to be inefficient but that did not stop them from producing more of those aircrafts which led to the belief that they are out of touch with their customers. Also, their frequent change of leadership could be considered a weakness as that makes them frequently go back to the drawing board to re-strategize. Boeing’s e-enabled advantage. (2016, Aug 07).

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Market imperfections and failures Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2500 words

Market imperfections and failures - Assignment Example Imperfect competition in the market generates asymmetric information and dampens the level of welfare in the society. Discriminations made by the monopolists in the market not only hamper the social utility, but also engages in misallocation of resources. Efficient allocation of productive resources helps to the economy to reach a Pareto optimal stage. However, in the real world, corruption and strategic business initiatives of certain firms in the industry have reduced the level of competition in the economies of most of the nations (BIS, 2013). Public authorities of the countries are now taking active initiatives to augment the level of market competition in the economies (CIA, 2013). The Competition Law or Policy adopted by a country helps to promote the level of market competition by imposing special rules and regulations on the anti-competitive practices conducted by the contemporary corporate firms. This paper would focus on the Competition Policy of U.K and would show how the objectives of the policies are related to the microeconomic theories of market. The learnt from this paper would help to analyze the negative impacts on an economy due to the lack of proper market competition (Hubbard, 2008). ... to protect the interests of the consumers in the country (Mankiw and Mark, 2006). The two main factors that were checked by this law were: Abuse of Market Power Collusive Behaviour The first competitive policy instruments in U.K were introduced about fifty years ago. The Department of Trade and Industry, The Director General of Fair Trade and the Competition Commission of the country had introduced their first competitive policy instruments (Woodford, 2001). Over time, subject to the external changes in the market, the terms and conditions of the policy have largely changed in U.K. Finally, in 1988, the Competition Act was again modified and adopted as the approach of ‘prohibition’ to prevent dominance in the marketplaces of U.K (Manne, 2012). Objectives The primary objectives of the Competition Policy in U.K were: 1. The Policy was the basis for the concepts of the Fair Trade Act 1973. Thus, one of its objectives was to serve the interests of the public (Assael, 2005). 2. The Policy aimed at providing guidance and constraints to the discretionary power of the ‘decision makers’ in the market. 3. It aimed to promote and maintain the market competition. 4. To assure that consumers received quality products at a good price. 5. To augment innovation and productive efficiency in the market. 6. Assure balanced distribution of employment and industry in U.K. 7. To enhance the competitive powers of the domestic companies of U.K. in order to easily compete with the foreign companies (OECD, 2002). Objectives Relating to Microeconomic Theories This context of the paper would highlight that the goals or the objects of the Competition Policy introduced by U.K. are based on the theories of microeconomics, which